Attractions in Manchester

There are endless attractions and places to visit in Manchester. Be absorbed by the beautiful gothic architecture at John Rylands Library and Manchester Cathedral. Take in fine art at Manchester Art Gallery and the Whitworth. Discover history, old and new, at Manchester Museum and the Imperial War Museum.

Of course Manchester is synonymous with football. So make some time tour of the grounds of Manchester United and Manchester City, and discover the social history of the beautiful game at the National Football Museum.

For those who enjoy the outdoors, a short journey from the city centre provides access to beautiful walks at such as Hollingworth Lake, Heaton Park, Sale Water Park and Haigh Hall.

As the commercial and cultural capital of Lancashire, Manchester is a noted center for the arts, media, and higher education. Together with Salford and eight other municipalities it forms the metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, in which some 3 million people now live.

The city played a big part in the industrial revolution and still contributes strongly to the British economy. It is one of the most lively and modern cities in Great Britain boasting impressive galleries, renowned theatres, fantastic shopping centres, clubs, museums and music, fine dining restaurants and cosmopolitan cafés.

Mancunian people are known throughout the country for their conviviality and hospitality and will provide you with many opportunities to continue practising your English outside of the classroom!

Beautiful English countryside such as the Lake District, the Yorkshire Dales and the historical cities of York and Chester are all easily accessible from Manchester and offer a picturesque view of the traditional British way of life.

The Museum of Science and Industry, housed in the former Liverpool Road railway station, has a large collection of steam locomotives, industrial machinery, aircraft and a replica of the world’s first stored computer program (known as The Baby).

The Manchester Museum opened to the public in the 1880s, has notable Egyptology and natural history collections. 

Manchester is such a great place to visit.

It is a city of doers and workers, and the old Industrial Revolution symbol of the worker bee, which still studs the mosaic floors of the Town Hall, feels as apt now as it ever did during Manchester’s industrial heyday.

In the south of the city, the Whitworth Art Gallery displays modern art, sculpture and textiles.

Other exhibition spaces and museums in Manchester include the Cornerhouse, the Urbis centre, the Manchester Costume Gallery at Platt Fields Park, the People’s History Museum and the Manchester Jewish Museum.

The works of Stretford-born painter L. S. Lowry, known for his “matchstick” paintings of industrial Manchester and Salford, can be seen in both the city and Whitworth Manchester galleries, and at the Lowry art centre in Salford Quays (in the neighbouring borough of Salford) devotes a large permanent exhibition to his works.

The Museum of Science and Industry

The Museum of Science and Industry

Discover Manchester's rich legacy of world-changing industrial innovations and scientific discoveries. The Museum of Science and Industry is devoted to inspiring their visitors through ideas that change the world, from the Industrial Revolution to today and beyond.

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Manchester Cathedral

Manchester Cathedral

Manchester Cathedral, formally the Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Mary, St Denys and St George, in Manchester, England, is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Manchester, seat of the Bishop of Manchester and the city's parish church.
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Chinatown

Chinatown

The colorful home of one of the largest Chinese communities in Britain, Chinatown is only a stone's throw from the Manchester Art Gallery. The richly decorated arched gateway leading into the district is especially striking.
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Manchester Town Hall

Manchester Town Hall

Manchester Town Hall (1868-77) in Albert Square is one of the most iconic landmarks in the city. Regarded as one of the finest examples of Neo-Gothic architecture in the United Kingdom. It is one of the most important Grade One listed buildings in England.-

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The National Football Museum

The National Football Museum

The National Football Museum is proud to be home to a Designated Collection. Recognised in 2013 by Arts Council England as a collection “of outstanding importance and value, that deepens our understanding of the world”.
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John Rylands Library

John Rylands Library

The John Rylands Library is a late-Victorian neo-Gothic building on Deansgate in Manchester. The library, which opened to the public in 1900, was founded by Enriqueta Augustina Rylands in memory of her husband, John Rylands
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